Category: SharePoint2010

List Workflows VS Reusable List Workflows VS Site workflows

List Workflows

A list workflow is the type of workflow that was available in SharePoint 2007. Because it has the context of the list for which it was created, list workflows automatically have access to the values of the custom fields for the list item on which they will run, such as the custom Notes field for a document library. List workflows cannot be made available to other lists or libraries on this or other sites. To have the same workflow functionality for multiple lists you must manually recreate the workflows in all locations.
If you know that you will only need the workflows you are designing for a specific list, the list workflow has the advantage of automatically making available the custom fields of the lists.

Reusable List Workflows

You can create a reusable list workflow (reusable workflow) in the top-level site in the site collection, and that workflow can be made globally reusable — meaning that the workflow can be associated to any list, library, or content type in the site collection. You can also create a reusable workflow in any subsite in the site collection; this workflow is available for reuse in that particular subsite.
You can also export a reusable workflow from one site and then upload and activate that workflow in a different site. For example, you can create a reusable workflow in a test environment, test it, and then export it to a production environment. SharePoint Designer 2010 supports exporting a workflow as a template.
Reusable workflows, by default, don’t have the context of a specific list or library. Therefore, by default, they provide only the columns that are common across lists and libraries, such as Created and Created By.
If your reusable workflow requires certain columns to be present in the list or library that you associated it to, you can add those columns as association columns. Association columns get added automatically to a list or library when a reusable workflow is associated to that list or library.
When you create a reusable workflow, you can alternatively choose to filter your reusable workflow to a specific content type. This enables you to work with the fields of the content type in SharePoint Designer 2010. For example, if a reusable list workflows is associated with the Document content type, you view and use in your workflow fields that are specific to the content type, such as Document ID. Then, in the browser, you can associate your reusable workflow either to a specific content type or to any content type that inherits from that content type. If you associate a workflow to a site content type, you make that workflow available for all items of that content type in every list and library on the site to which that content type has been added. You can even make it available for sites in a collection if the workflow is configured to be a Globally Reusable Workflow.
If you want users to be able to use the workflows you are designing on multiple sites, lists, libraries, and content types, a reusable workflow will probably best meets your needs. We expect that most workflows for SharePoint 2010 will use reusable workflows.

Site workflows

A site workflow is associated to a site — not to a list, library, or content type. So unlike most workflows, a site workflow is not running on a specific list item. Because of this, many of the actions that are available for items not available for site workflows.
In the browser, you start a site workflow or view the status of running site workflows by clicking the Site Actionsmenu, click View All Site Content, and then clicking Site Workflows.
If you want to create a workflow, but don’t need a list, library, or content type for the workflows, a site workflow will probably best meet your needs. For example, you can create a site workflow as a way for people to provide feedback about your site.
Site workflows can only be started manually.


(Copied from https://support.office.com/en-ca/article/Introduction-to-designing-and-customizing-workflows-32c9c0bf-5e20-4f74-8b9c-d3ea79f2962b)


Get current site web URL in JavaScript or JQuery

 

Use JavaScript variable name “L_Menu_BaseUrl” to get current web url and map it to any code in JavaScript.  This variable will be initialized on SharePoint pages by default. Below script will be always there when you do view source of the page:

var L_Menu_BaseUrl=”/ESearchCenter”;
var L_Menu_LCID=”1033″;
var L_Menu_SiteTheme=””;

OR

You can make use of  below variables

1. var webUrl = _spPageContextInfo.webServerRelativeUrl;
2. var siteUrl = _spPageContextInfo.siteServerRelativeUrl;

Step by step – Enable Form based authentication in SharePoint 2010 or SharePoint 2013 (step by step FBA / Claims based authentication)

Finally done 🙂

I was planning to implement and write a article with screen shots about claims from long time.

Follow below steps to enable Form based authentication in SharePoint 2010 or SharePoint 2013.

Change Search tips link from advance search page – SharePoint 2010 Search

<script src="jquery-1.11.1.min.js”>

$( document ).ready(function() {
$(“.ms-advsrchtips” ).find(‘a’).attr(“href”, “javascript:openDiaFormadvsrchtips();”)
});

function openDiaFormadvsrchtips()
{

   //Use SP.UI.$create_DialogOptions() instead of SP.UI.create_DialogOptions()
   //The name of the method starts with a “$”
   var diaOptions = SP.UI.$create_DialogOptions();
   diaOptions.url = ”;
   diaOptions.width = 800;
   diaOptions.height = 550;
   diaOptions.title = “Search Tips”;
   SP.UI.ModalDialog.showModalDialog(diaOptions);
}

SPWeb Template details using Get-SPWebTemplate PowerShell command (STS#)

The command I ran in ISE is:

Get-SPWebTemplate

Output:

Name
Title
LocaleId
Custom
—-
—–
——–
——
GLOBAL#0
Global template
1033
FALSE
STS#0
Team Site
1033
FALSE
STS#1
Blank Site
1033
FALSE
STS#2
Document Workspace
1033
FALSE
MPS#0
Basic Meeting Workspace
1033
FALSE
MPS#1
Blank Meeting Workspace
1033
FALSE
MPS#2
Decision Meeting Workspace
1033
FALSE
MPS#3
Social Meeting Workspace
1033
FALSE
MPS#4
Multipage Meeting Workspace
1033
FALSE
CENTRALADMIN#0
Central Admin Site
1033
FALSE
WIKI#0
Wiki Site
1033
FALSE
BLOG#0
Blog
1033
FALSE
SGS#0
Group Work Site
1033
FALSE
TENANTADMIN#0
Tenant Admin Site
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#0
Access Services Site
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#1
Assets Web Database
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#3
Charitable Contributions Web Database
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#4
Contacts Web Database
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#6
Issues Web Database
1033
FALSE
ACCSRV#5
Projects Web Database
1033
FALSE
BDR#0
Document Center
1033
FALSE
OFFILE#0
(obsolete) Records Center
1033
FALSE
OFFILE#1
Records Center
1033
FALSE
OSRV#0
Shared Services Administration Site
1033
FALSE
PPSMASite#0
PerformancePoint
1033
FALSE
BICenterSite#0
Business Intelligence Center
1033
FALSE
SPS#0
SharePoint Portal Server Site
1033
FALSE
SPSPERS#0
SharePoint Portal Server Personal Space
1033
FALSE
SPSMSITE#0
Personalization Site
1033
FALSE
SPSTOC#0
Contents area Template
1033
FALSE
SPSTOPIC#0
Topic area template
1033
FALSE
SPSNEWS#0
News Site
1033
FALSE
CMSPUBLISHING#0
Publishing Site
1033
FALSE
BLANKINTERNET#0
Publishing Site
1033
FALSE
BLANKINTERNET#1
Press Releases Site
1033
FALSE
BLANKINTERNET#2
Publishing Site with Workflow
1033
FALSE
SPSNHOME#0
News Site
1033
FALSE
SPSSITES#0
Site Directory
1033
FALSE
SPSCOMMU#0
Community area template
1033
FALSE
SPSREPORTCENTER#0
Report Center
1033
FALSE
SPSPORTAL#0
Collaboration Portal
1033
FALSE
SRCHCEN#0
Enterprise Search Center
1033
FALSE
PROFILES#0
Profiles
1033
FALSE
BLANKINTERNETCONT…
Publishing Portal
1033
FALSE
SPSMSITEHOST#0
My Site Host
1033
FALSE
ENTERWIKI#0
Enterprise Wiki
1033
FALSE
SRCHCENTERLITE#0
Basic Search Center
1033
FALSE
SRCHCENTERLITE#1
Basic Search Center
1033
FALSE
SRCHCENTERFAST#0
FAST Search Center
1033
FALSE
visprus#0
Visio Process Repository
1033
FALSE